Tuesday, June 18, 2019

WOD Update

Counter Culture
Wondering why no posts for about a week?

I have not been sleeping, I have been updating my SQL server with new WOD data (2019).

I have downloaded the yearly files, and have converted them from WOD into CSV format.

The WOD file types I use are APB, CTD, DRB, GLD, MRB, OSD, PFL, and UOR, which excludes MBT, SUR, and XBT.

Below, in this post, is a list of the files arranged in groups by WOD file type.

The individual files are listed by size (from largest to smallest) in each file-type section.

The list includes casts and in situ measurements per file, a subtotal of casts and measurements for each file type section, then at the end of the complete list is a total of all casts (about 23 million), and all in situ measurements (about 5.5 billion).

In fairly short order I will be posting some new ideas, using the new data.

APBO2005: 346,231 casts, 19,756,923 in situ measurements
APBO2007: 261,266 casts, 16,200,433 in situ measurements
APBO2008: 254,145 casts, 15,984,645 in situ measurements
APBS2005: 346,231 casts, 11,473,818 in situ measurements
APBO2010: 165,137 casts, 12,141,483 in situ measurements
APBO2006: 137,722 casts, 10,585,613 in situ measurements
APBS2008: 254,145 casts, 9,590,204 in situ measurements
APBS2007: 261,266 casts, 9,169,282 in situ measurements
APBO2009: 127,882 casts, 8,779,947 in situ measurements
APBO2004: 164,311 casts, 7,562,141 in situ measurements
APBS2010: 165,137 casts, 6,215,167 in situ measurements
APBS2009: 127,882 casts, 5,434,867 in situ measurements
APBS2004: 164,311 casts, 4,745,861 in situ measurements
APBS2006: 137,722 casts, 4,511,642 in situ measurements
APBS1998: 44,626 casts, 5,696,807 in situ measurements
APBS2011: 61,909 casts, 2,689,223 in situ measurements
APBO2011: 61,909 casts, 2,928,517 in situ measurements
APBS2012: 51,589 casts, 2,625,751 in situ measurements
APBS2014: 44,671 casts, 2,382,490 in situ measurements
APBO1998: 44,626 casts, 2,777,548 in situ measurements
APBO2012: 51,589 casts, 2,261,831 in situ measurements
APBS2018: 44,294 casts, 2,185,135 in situ measurements
APBO2014: 44,671 casts, 1,770,252 in situ measurements
APBS2015: 30,680 casts, 1,667,212 in situ measurements
APBS1997: 19,875 casts, 2,014,858 in situ measurements
APBS2016: 32,020 casts, 1,522,535 in situ measurements
APBO2018: 44,294 casts, 1,171,638 in situ measurements
APBS2013: 25,307 casts, 1,269,668 in situ measurements
APBS2017: 27,180 casts, 1,163,155 in situ measurements
APBO2016: 32,020 casts, 1,216,170 in situ measurements
APBO2015: 30,680 casts, 1,144,727 in situ measurements
APBO1997: 19,875 casts, 1,232,148 in situ measurements
APBS1999: 11,164 casts, 1,297,228 in situ measurements
APBO2013: 25,307 casts, 999,582 in situ measurements
APBO2017: 27,180 casts, 899,308 in situ measurements
APBO1999: 11,164 casts, 551,920 in situ measurements

APB: 3,700,018 casts, 183,619,729 in situ measurements

CTDO1995: 34,687 casts, 59,023,021 in situ measurements
CTDO2003: 23,269 casts, 53,736,969 in situ measurements
CTDO2001: 32,184 casts, 50,525,473 in situ measurements
CTDO2005: 26,039 casts, 51,287,370 in situ measurements
CTDO2007: 30,453 casts, 50,951,259 in situ measurements
CTDO1994: 33,063 casts, 49,463,773 in situ measurements
CTDO1993: 33,541 casts, 45,766,402 in situ measurements
CTDO1996: 28,854 casts, 45,687,135 in situ measurements
CTDO2006: 24,727 casts, 45,794,230 in situ measurements
CTDO2004: 23,989 casts, 46,223,065 in situ measurements
CTDO2000: 31,397 casts, 44,886,201 in situ measurements
CTDO1992: 31,976 casts, 44,500,455 in situ measurements
CTDO1998: 34,727 casts, 44,589,624 in situ measurements
CTDO2002: 25,729 casts, 43,675,457 in situ measurements
CTDO1997: 32,369 casts, 44,021,639 in situ measurements
CTDO2009: 26,203 casts, 44,157,758 in situ measurements
CTDO1999: 35,794 casts, 42,588,816 in situ measurements
CTDO1991: 28,583 casts, 39,883,298 in situ measurements
CTDO2008: 29,924 casts, 39,720,345 in situ measurements
CTDO2010: 26,903 casts, 39,315,584 in situ measurements
CTDO2011: 24,038 casts, 30,813,239 in situ measurements
CTDO2012: 25,055 casts, 28,789,796 in situ measurements
CTDO1987: 25,982 casts, 27,491,054 in situ measurements
CTDO2013: 29,009 casts, 27,239,698 in situ measurements
CTDO1989: 23,728 casts, 26,661,760 in situ measurements
CTDO1988: 20,134 casts, 25,085,729 in situ measurements
CTDO1990: 23,355 casts, 23,989,865 in situ measurements
CTDO1985: 15,878 casts, 21,049,732 in situ measurements
CTDO1983: 13,858 casts, 21,144,018 in situ measurements
CTDO2016: 23,828 casts, 19,614,093 in situ measurements
CTDO1986: 19,015 casts, 19,095,641 in situ measurements
CTDO1984: 15,441 casts, 17,988,934 in situ measurements
CTDO2015: 24,700 casts, 17,230,553 in situ measurements
CTDO2014: 27,604 casts, 16,522,953 in situ measurements
CTDO1981: 13,988 casts, 15,331,648 in situ measurements
CTDO1978: 18,449 casts, 14,440,518 in situ measurements
CTDO1982: 12,475 casts, 13,098,673 in situ measurements
CTDO2017: 22,004 casts, 11,207,645 in situ measurements
CTDO1979: 11,598 casts, 10,686,782 in situ measurements
CTDO1974: 8,009 casts, 9,627,003 in situ measurements
CTDO1980: 10,858 casts, 9,052,499 in situ measurements
CTDO1973: 5,740 casts, 8,901,203 in situ measurements
CTDO2018: 13,683 casts, 6,234,865 in situ measurements
CTDO1976: 9,455 casts, 5,754,779 in situ measurements
CTDO1975: 8,275 casts, 5,384,740 in situ measurements
CTDO1977: 10,347 casts, 5,301,624 in situ measurements
CTDO1972: 4,451 casts, 4,161,419 in situ measurements
CTDO1969: 3,230 casts, 3,537,080 in situ measurements
CTDS1995: 34,687 casts, 2,475,908 in situ measurements
CTDS1993: 33,541 casts, 2,261,304 in situ measurements
CTDS1994: 33,063 casts, 2,283,941 in situ measurements
CTDS1992: 31,976 casts, 2,196,601 in situ measurements
CTDS1999: 35,794 casts, 2,068,401 in situ measurements
CTDS2007: 30,453 casts, 2,146,292 in situ measurements
CTDS2001: 32,184 casts, 2,014,378 in situ measurements
CTDS1998: 34,727 casts, 1,998,436 in situ measurements
CTDS1997: 32,369 casts, 2,004,809 in situ measurements
CTDS1991: 28,583 casts, 1,937,273 in situ measurements
CTDS2000: 31,397 casts, 1,865,842 in situ measurements
CTDS1996: 28,854 casts, 1,851,952 in situ measurements
CTDS2008: 29,924 casts, 1,828,063 in situ measurements
CTDS2010: 26,903 casts, 1,845,711 in situ measurements
CTDS2005: 26,039 casts, 1,816,340 in situ measurements
CTDS2009: 26,203 casts, 1,814,660 in situ measurements
CTDS2013: 29,009 casts, 1,658,935 in situ measurements
CTDS2003: 23,269 casts, 1,725,319 in situ measurements
CTDS2004: 23,989 casts, 1,758,062 in situ measurements
CTDS2002: 25,729 casts, 1,653,433 in situ measurements
CTDS2006: 24,727 casts, 1,643,194 in situ measurements
CTDS1987: 25,982 casts, 1,577,154 in situ measurements
CTDS2012: 25,055 casts, 1,522,805 in situ measurements
CTDO1967: 1,531 casts, 1,786,484 in situ measurements
CTDS2011: 24,038 casts, 1,505,260 in situ measurements
CTDS1989: 23,728 casts, 1,504,430 in situ measurements
CTDS1990: 23,355 casts, 1,406,468 in situ measurements
CTDS2016: 23,828 casts, 1,349,291 in situ measurements
CTDS2014: 27,604 casts, 1,295,140 in situ measurements
CTDS2015: 24,700 casts, 1,300,386 in situ measurements
CTDS1988: 20,134 casts, 1,267,199 in situ measurements
CTDS2017: 22,004 casts, 1,096,088 in situ measurements
CTDS1986: 19,015 casts, 1,149,067 in situ measurements
CTDS1985: 15,878 casts, 986,043 in situ measurements
CTDS1984: 15,441 casts, 994,611 in situ measurements
CTDS1983: 13,858 casts, 1,024,482 in situ measurements
CTDS1978: 18,449 casts, 930,972 in situ measurements
CTDS1981: 13,988 casts, 846,747 in situ measurements
CTDS1982: 12,475 casts, 768,279 in situ measurements
CTDS2018: 13,683 casts, 726,200 in situ measurements
CTDO1971: 2,075 casts, 883,010 in situ measurements
CTDS1979: 11,598 casts, 703,879 in situ measurements
CTDS1980: 10,858 casts, 670,160 in situ measurements
CTDO1968: 1,286 casts, 806,707 in situ measurements
CTDS1974: 8,009 casts, 523,221 in situ measurements
CTDS1977: 10,347 casts, 493,538 in situ measurements
CTDS1976: 9,455 casts, 494,286 in situ measurements
CTDS1975: 8,275 casts, 446,426 in situ measurements
CTDS1973: 5,740 casts, 463,259 in situ measurements
CTDS1972: 4,451 casts, 301,951 in situ measurements
CTDS1969: 3,230 casts, 235,374 in situ measurements
CTDO1970: 1,748 casts, 236,070 in situ measurements
CTDS1971: 2,075 casts, 120,388 in situ measurements
CTDS1967: 1,531 casts, 120,014 in situ measurements
CTDS1970: 1,748 casts, 83,436 in situ measurements
CTDS1968: 1,286 casts, 82,118 in situ measurements
CTDO1961: 97 casts, 2,258 in situ measurements
CTDS1961: 97 casts, 744 in situ measurements
CTDS1964: 47 casts, 1,250 in situ measurements
CTDO1964: 47 casts, 834 in situ measurements
CTDO1963: 71 casts, 282 in situ measurements
CTDS1963: 71 casts, 201 in situ measurements
CTDO1962: 42 casts, 397 in situ measurements
CTDS1962: 42 casts, 264 in situ measurements
CTDO1966: 12 casts, 190 in situ measurements
CTDS1966: 12 casts, 123 in situ measurements

CTD: 2,131,014 casts, 1,441,791,757 in situ measurements

DRBO2008: 7,131 casts, 15,507,234 in situ measurements
DRBO2013: 17,662 casts, 14,079,754 in situ measurements
DRBO2007: 9,231 casts, 12,860,317 in situ measurements
DRBO2012: 14,737 casts, 12,055,406 in situ measurements
DRBO2009: 12,897 casts, 11,468,923 in situ measurements
DRBO2010: 5,301 casts, 10,535,137 in situ measurements
DRBO2011: 6,999 casts, 9,280,542 in situ measurements
DRBO2006: 4,655 casts, 7,397,441 in situ measurements
DRBO2014: 12,705 casts, 6,694,836 in situ measurements
DRBO2015: 7,077 casts, 5,918,778 in situ measurements
DRBO2017: 3,669 casts, 3,177,700 in situ measurements
DRBS2001: 62,952 casts, 1,413,167 in situ measurements
DRBO2016: 4,444 casts, 2,798,180 in situ measurements
DRBO2005: 10,332 casts, 2,477,322 in situ measurements
DRBO2001: 62,952 casts, 651,408 in situ measurements
DRBS2013: 17,662 casts, 905,150 in situ measurements
DRBS2012: 14,737 casts, 748,009 in situ measurements
DRBO2018: 1,549 casts, 924,312 in situ measurements
DRBS2014: 12,705 casts, 615,097 in situ measurements
DRBS2009: 12,897 casts, 576,717 in situ measurements
DRBS2007: 9,231 casts, 511,184 in situ measurements
DRBS2008: 7,131 casts, 555,568 in situ measurements
DRBO2004: 5,681 casts, 590,737 in situ measurements
DRBS2005: 10,332 casts, 431,448 in situ measurements
DRBS2015: 7,077 casts, 470,251 in situ measurements
DRBS2011: 6,999 casts, 459,001 in situ measurements
DRBS2010: 5,301 casts, 408,761 in situ measurements
DRBS2003: 7,905 casts, 290,050 in situ measurements
DRBS2000: 12,611 casts, 179,676 in situ measurements
DRBS2002: 9,249 casts, 253,740 in situ measurements
DRBS2006: 4,655 casts, 313,959 in situ measurements
DRBS2017: 3,669 casts, 333,034 in situ measurements
DRBS2016: 4,444 casts, 279,020 in situ measurements
DRBO2000: 12,611 casts, 117,017 in situ measurements
DRBS2004: 5,681 casts, 203,634 in situ measurements
DRBO2002: 9,249 casts, 100,767 in situ measurements
DRBO2003: 7,905 casts, 92,109 in situ measurements
DRBS1999: 4,770 casts, 70,679 in situ measurements
DRBS2018: 1,549 casts, 121,207 in situ measurements
DRBO1999: 4,770 casts, 45,884 in situ measurements
DRBS1989: 1,510 casts, 57,191 in situ measurements
DRBS1988: 1,387 casts, 55,878 in situ measurements
DRBS1990: 1,175 casts, 46,853 in situ measurements
DRBS1991: 1,422 casts, 31,548 in situ measurements
DRBO1989: 1,510 casts, 17,185 in situ measurements
DRBO1988: 1,387 casts, 16,175 in situ measurements
DRBS1992: 606 casts, 24,770 in situ measurements
DRBO1991: 1,422 casts, 11,878 in situ measurements
DRBO1990: 1,175 casts, 13,728 in situ measurements
DRBS1994: 532 casts, 21,456 in situ measurements
DRBS1986: 482 casts, 20,500 in situ measurements
DRBS1993: 462 casts, 18,192 in situ measurements
DRBS1987: 447 casts, 18,890 in situ measurements
DRBO1992: 606 casts, 6,874 in situ measurements
DRBO1994: 532 casts, 6,066 in situ measurements
DRBO1986: 482 casts, 5,784 in situ measurements
DRBS1985: 217 casts, 9,204 in situ measurements
DRBO1993: 462 casts, 5,244 in situ measurements
DRBO1987: 447 casts, 5,364 in situ measurements
DRBO1985: 217 casts, 2,604 in situ measurements
DRBO1998: 3 casts, 146 in situ measurements
DRBS1998: 3 casts, 143 in situ measurements

DRB: 459,600 casts, 126,308,829 in situ measurements

GLDO2015A: 55,436 casts, 60,728,015 in situ measurements
GLDO2017A: 69,587 casts, 57,409,810 in situ measurements
GLDO2010A: 79,208 casts, 54,454,124 in situ measurements
GLDO2011A: 50,667 casts, 54,144,534 in situ measurements
GLDO2017B: 73,984 casts, 56,669,027 in situ measurements
GLDO2014C: 62,649 casts, 60,425,149 in situ measurements
GLDO2013C: 80,098 casts, 58,934,329 in situ measurements
GLDO2012A: 38,454 casts, 56,291,099 in situ measurements
GLDO2012B: 42,637 casts, 58,559,628 in situ measurements
GLDO2014A: 40,768 casts, 62,130,484 in situ measurements
GLDO2009A: 61,210 casts, 57,113,588 in situ measurements
GLDO2013B: 40,986 casts, 61,071,982 in situ measurements
GLDO2014B: 45,027 casts, 60,735,341 in situ measurements
GLDO2013A: 47,419 casts, 60,569,595 in situ measurements
GLDO2016A: 64,280 casts, 57,416,310 in situ measurements
GLDO2016B: 79,167 casts, 56,965,541 in situ measurements
GLDO2018A: 93,808 casts, 56,169,063 in situ measurements
GLDO2014D: 40,792 casts, 50,550,342 in situ measurements
GLDO2015B: 46,198 casts, 39,993,617 in situ measurements
GLDO2016C: 35,022 casts, 35,100,689 in situ measurements
GLDO2013D: 23,440 casts, 32,929,932 in situ measurements
GLDO2012C: 21,939 casts, 29,067,976 in situ measurements
GLDO2011B: 29,095 casts, 26,174,689 in situ measurements
GLDO2010B: 18,745 casts, 24,486,424 in situ measurements
GLDO2004: 9,620 casts, 22,134,578 in situ measurements
GLDO2008: 12,738 casts, 21,725,298 in situ measurements
GLDO2005: 8,205 casts, 20,105,810 in situ measurements
GLDS2014: 189,236 casts, 15,172,399 in situ measurements
GLDO2007: 8,599 casts, 16,462,410 in situ measurements
GLDS2013: 191,943 casts, 13,144,310 in situ measurements
GLDS2016: 178,469 casts, 11,586,688 in situ measurements
GLDS2017: 148,996 casts, 10,410,099 in situ measurements
GLDS2015: 101,634 casts, 8,905,786 in situ measurements
GLDS2012: 103,030 casts, 8,235,691 in situ measurements
GLDO2003: 2,313 casts, 9,288,635 in situ measurements
GLDO2006: 5,162 casts, 8,483,726 in situ measurements
GLDS2010: 97,953 casts, 6,799,761 in situ measurements
GLDS2018: 96,389 casts, 5,972,567 in situ measurements
GLDS2009: 64,392 casts, 6,937,481 in situ measurements
GLDS2011: 79,762 casts, 6,412,524 in situ measurements
GLDO2017C: 5,425 casts, 4,197,429 in situ measurements
GLDO2009B: 3,182 casts, 3,331,606 in situ measurements
GLDS2008: 12,738 casts, 2,062,176 in situ measurements
GLDO2002: 1,492 casts, 2,180,072 in situ measurements
GLDS2007: 8,599 casts, 1,699,266 in situ measurements
GLDS2005: 8,205 casts, 1,565,975 in situ measurements
GLDS2004: 9,620 casts, 1,511,351 in situ measurements
GLDO2018B: 2,581 casts, 1,246,274 in situ measurements
GLDO2019: 1,876 casts, 1,054,049 in situ measurements
GLDS2006: 5,162 casts, 898,388 in situ measurements
GLDS2003: 2,313 casts, 502,998 in situ measurements
GLDS2002: 1,492 casts, 226,516 in situ measurements
GLDS2019: 1,876 casts, 183,733 in situ measurements

GLD: 2,603,618 casts, 1,440,528,884 in situ measurements

MRBS2005: 241,327 casts, 7,405,814 in situ measurements
MRBS2004: 240,773 casts, 7,281,853 in situ measurements
MRBS2006: 161,209 casts, 4,989,107 in situ measurements
MRBS2003: 115,950 casts, 3,677,291 in situ measurements
MRBO2005: 241,327 casts, 2,129,175 in situ measurements
MRBO2004: 240,773 casts, 2,108,074 in situ measurements
MRBO2006: 161,209 casts, 1,509,239 in situ measurements
MRBO2003: 115,950 casts, 1,120,973 in situ measurements
MRBS2011: 44,244 casts, 1,557,980 in situ measurements
MRBS2010: 37,432 casts, 1,451,682 in situ measurements
MRBS2009: 36,328 casts, 1,399,450 in situ measurements
MRBS2012: 36,172 casts, 1,406,191 in situ measurements
MRBS2008: 34,660 casts, 1,330,911 in situ measurements
MRBS2007: 33,344 casts, 1,325,336 in situ measurements
MRBS2015: 34,438 casts, 1,263,553 in situ measurements
MRBS2000: 37,707 casts, 1,175,591 in situ measurements
MRBS2016: 33,413 casts, 1,225,571 in situ measurements
MRBS1995: 44,308 casts, 957,135 in situ measurements
MRBS1994: 47,594 casts, 863,085 in situ measurements
MRBS2013: 31,711 casts, 1,167,486 in situ measurements
MRBS2002: 30,054 casts, 1,167,813 in situ measurements
MRBS2018: 31,949 casts, 1,122,670 in situ measurements
MRBS1999: 39,963 casts, 993,719 in situ measurements
MRBS2001: 31,650 casts, 1,081,626 in situ measurements
MRBS2014: 29,411 casts, 1,099,027 in situ measurements
MRBS1996: 38,158 casts, 896,122 in situ measurements
MRBS2017: 29,221 casts, 1,028,537 in situ measurements
MRBS1998: 37,422 casts, 846,418 in situ measurements
MRBS1997: 32,921 casts, 802,487 in situ measurements
MRBS1993: 33,823 casts, 756,382 in situ measurements
MRBO2011: 44,244 casts, 599,168 in situ measurements
MRBS1992: 24,032 casts, 642,240 in situ measurements
MRBO2010: 37,432 casts, 544,065 in situ measurements
MRBO2009: 36,328 casts, 528,449 in situ measurements
MRBO2012: 36,172 casts, 526,155 in situ measurements
MRBO2008: 34,660 casts, 499,214 in situ measurements
MRBO1995: 44,308 casts, 339,969 in situ measurements
MRBO1994: 47,594 casts, 321,008 in situ measurements
MRBO2007: 33,344 casts, 503,890 in situ measurements
MRBO2015: 34,438 casts, 481,717 in situ measurements
MRBO2000: 37,707 casts, 426,259 in situ measurements
MRBO1999: 39,963 casts, 360,395 in situ measurements
MRBO2016: 33,413 casts, 460,487 in situ measurements
MRBO2018: 31,949 casts, 432,026 in situ measurements
MRBO1996: 38,158 casts, 309,677 in situ measurements
MRBO2013: 31,711 casts, 435,774 in situ measurements
MRBO2002: 30,054 casts, 436,277 in situ measurements
MRBO2001: 31,650 casts, 407,273 in situ measurements
MRBO1998: 37,422 casts, 306,294 in situ measurements
MRBO2014: 29,411 casts, 413,309 in situ measurements
MRBO2017: 29,221 casts, 396,010 in situ measurements
MRBO1997: 32,921 casts, 283,377 in situ measurements
MRBO1993: 33,823 casts, 265,280 in situ measurements
MRBO1992: 24,032 casts, 199,984 in situ measurements
MRBS1991: 9,825 casts, 267,673 in situ measurements
MRBS1990: 8,517 casts, 199,671 in situ measurements
MRBS1989: 8,352 casts, 191,486 in situ measurements
MRBS1988: 6,965 casts, 146,303 in situ measurements
MRBO1991: 9,825 casts, 92,017 in situ measurements
MRBS1987: 4,401 casts, 111,460 in situ measurements
MRBO1990: 8,517 casts, 78,872 in situ measurements
MRBO1989: 8,352 casts, 76,597 in situ measurements
MRBO1988: 6,965 casts, 61,579 in situ measurements
MRBS1986: 3,328 casts, 82,617 in situ measurements
MRBO1987: 4,401 casts, 45,466 in situ measurements
MRBS1985: 1,951 casts, 44,134 in situ measurements
MRBO1986: 3,328 casts, 30,653 in situ measurements
MRBS1984: 1,464 casts, 33,461 in situ measurements
MRBS1983: 1,370 casts, 31,901 in situ measurements
MRBS1980: 1,307 casts, 30,365 in situ measurements
MRBS1979: 1,184 casts, 25,848 in situ measurements
MRBS1981: 1,148 casts, 26,602 in situ measurements
MRBO1985: 1,951 casts, 18,147 in situ measurements
MRBS1982: 931 casts, 22,398 in situ measurements
MRBO1984: 1,464 casts, 13,016 in situ measurements
MRBO1983: 1,370 casts, 9,440 in situ measurements
MRBO1980: 1,307 casts, 8,600 in situ measurements
MRBO1981: 1,148 casts, 7,375 in situ measurements
MRBO1979: 1,184 casts, 6,616 in situ measurements
MRBO1982: 931 casts, 7,243 in situ measurements
MRBS1978: 240 casts, 4,648 in situ measurements
MRBS1977: 173 casts, 4,287 in situ measurements
MRBO1978: 240 casts, 1,322 in situ measurements
MRBO1977: 173 casts, 1,102 in situ measurements

MRB: 3,240,740 casts, 66,939,494 in situ measurements

OSDS1987: 71,390 casts, 4,763,010 in situ measurements
OSDS1986: 73,326 casts, 4,417,413 in situ measurements
OSDS1988: 66,884 casts, 4,483,599 in situ measurements
OSDS1989: 68,951 casts, 4,307,723 in situ measurements
OSDS1985: 70,889 casts, 4,428,134 in situ measurements
OSDS1972: 72,307 casts, 4,367,906 in situ measurements
OSDS1978: 69,175 casts, 3,836,896 in situ measurements
OSDS1984: 65,805 casts, 4,428,424 in situ measurements
OSDS1981: 67,322 casts, 3,956,830 in situ measurements
OSDS1979: 71,476 casts, 3,710,882 in situ measurements
OSDS1973: 67,299 casts, 4,048,477 in situ measurements
OSDS1976: 61,227 casts, 3,948,936 in situ measurements
OSDS1980: 66,295 casts, 3,841,198 in situ measurements
OSDS1983: 62,581 casts, 4,051,144 in situ measurements
OSDS1969: 65,663 casts, 3,828,462 in situ measurements
OSDS1990: 65,343 casts, 4,005,077 in situ measurements
OSDS1982: 63,536 casts, 3,713,739 in situ measurements
OSDS1971: 64,603 casts, 3,882,305 in situ measurements
OSDS1977: 60,036 casts, 3,645,164 in situ measurements
OSDS1970: 58,817 casts, 3,592,659 in situ measurements
OSDS1974: 61,437 casts, 3,761,846 in situ measurements
OSDS1967: 60,204 casts, 3,327,899 in situ measurements
OSDS1975: 56,967 casts, 3,435,923 in situ measurements
OSDS1968: 57,077 casts, 3,401,406 in situ measurements
OSDS1966: 57,142 casts, 3,219,034 in situ measurements
OSDS1965: 58,229 casts, 3,309,927 in situ measurements
OSDO1987: 71,390 casts, 2,546,773 in situ measurements
OSDS1964: 56,925 casts, 2,860,746 in situ measurements
OSDS1963: 50,684 casts, 2,663,298 in situ measurements
OSDS1995: 39,123 casts, 3,011,605 in situ measurements
OSDO1988: 66,884 casts, 2,480,420 in situ measurements
OSDO1986: 73,326 casts, 2,312,208 in situ measurements
OSDO1989: 68,951 casts, 2,272,149 in situ measurements
OSDO1985: 70,889 casts, 2,502,220 in situ measurements
OSDO1978: 69,175 casts, 1,879,123 in situ measurements
OSDO1981: 67,322 casts, 2,107,871 in situ measurements
OSDO1979: 71,476 casts, 1,920,402 in situ measurements
OSDS1991: 45,849 casts, 2,798,701 in situ measurements
OSDS1993: 38,368 casts, 2,963,315 in situ measurements
OSDO1980: 66,295 casts, 1,954,536 in situ measurements
OSDS1992: 39,588 casts, 2,616,230 in situ measurements
OSDO1990: 65,343 casts, 2,301,650 in situ measurements
OSDO1984: 65,805 casts, 2,224,613 in situ measurements
OSDO1983: 62,581 casts, 2,116,302 in situ measurements
OSDO1976: 61,227 casts, 1,869,762 in situ measurements
OSDO1972: 72,307 casts, 1,878,780 in situ measurements
OSDO1982: 63,536 casts, 1,916,381 in situ measurements
OSDO1973: 67,290 casts, 1,819,619 in situ measurements
OSDS1996: 32,169 casts, 2,194,654 in situ measurements
OSDS1994: 32,030 casts, 2,693,138 in situ measurements
OSDO1977: 60,036 casts, 1,726,017 in situ measurements
OSDS1997: 30,756 casts, 2,039,239 in situ measurements
OSDO1969: 65,663 casts, 1,644,942 in situ measurements
OSDO1970: 58,817 casts, 1,590,720 in situ measurements
OSDO1971: 64,600 casts, 1,649,082 in situ measurements
OSDO1975: 56,965 casts, 1,597,189 in situ measurements
OSDO1967: 60,204 casts, 1,382,762 in situ measurements
OSDO1974: 61,426 casts, 1,698,779 in situ measurements
OSDO1995: 39,123 casts, 1,649,425 in situ measurements
OSDS1962: 37,498 casts, 1,939,451 in situ measurements
OSDO1966: 57,142 casts, 1,366,652 in situ measurements
OSDO1963: 50,684 casts, 1,107,270 in situ measurements
OSDS1961: 39,985 casts, 1,973,907 in situ measurements
OSDO1964: 56,925 casts, 1,200,874 in situ measurements
OSDO1968: 57,077 casts, 1,448,688 in situ measurements
OSDS1960: 39,520 casts, 1,965,669 in situ measurements
OSDO1965: 58,229 casts, 1,341,799 in situ measurements
OSDS1998: 26,232 casts, 1,587,440 in situ measurements
OSDS1958: 36,099 casts, 1,908,792 in situ measurements
OSDS1959: 38,281 casts, 1,826,959 in situ measurements
OSDO1996: 32,169 casts, 1,293,574 in situ measurements
OSDO1991: 45,849 casts, 1,484,573 in situ measurements
OSDO1992: 39,588 casts, 1,354,906 in situ measurements
OSDO1997: 30,756 casts, 1,132,192 in situ measurements
OSDO1993: 38,368 casts, 1,501,246 in situ measurements
OSDS1999: 25,770 casts, 1,345,832 in situ measurements
OSDO1994: 32,030 casts, 1,388,997 in situ measurements
OSDS1957: 29,745 casts, 1,394,941 in situ measurements
OSDS1955: 23,402 casts, 1,038,196 in situ measurements
OSDO1998: 26,232 casts, 844,638 in situ measurements
OSDS2005: 14,761 casts, 1,521,212 in situ measurements
OSDS1800: 99,507 casts, 300,144 in situ measurements
OSDO1962: 37,498 casts, 807,637 in situ measurements
OSDS2003: 15,069 casts, 1,470,669 in situ measurements
OSDS2000: 20,679 casts, 1,255,456 in situ measurements
OSDS1954: 23,958 casts, 939,994 in situ measurements
OSDS2001: 18,754 casts, 1,257,479 in situ measurements
OSDO1800: 99,507 casts, 247,755 in situ measurements
OSDS1956: 27,722 casts, 1,080,655 in situ measurements
OSDS1952: 27,393 casts, 1,041,166 in situ measurements
OSDS2004: 14,711 casts, 1,336,308 in situ measurements
OSDO1961: 39,985 casts, 833,165 in situ measurements
OSDO1999: 25,770 casts, 742,700 in situ measurements
OSDS1953: 22,693 casts, 960,725 in situ measurements
OSDO1960: 39,520 casts, 829,902 in situ measurements
OSDS2002: 15,410 casts, 1,173,218 in situ measurements
OSDS1951: 26,130 casts, 980,879 in situ measurements
OSDO1959: 38,281 casts, 766,843 in situ measurements
OSDO1958: 36,099 casts, 782,256 in situ measurements
OSDS2007: 11,941 casts, 1,334,161 in situ measurements
OSDS2006: 14,145 casts, 1,156,740 in situ measurements
OSDO1955: 23,402 casts, 437,211 in situ measurements
OSDS1950: 19,159 casts, 875,204 in situ measurements
OSDS2008: 10,945 casts, 1,123,570 in situ measurements
OSDS2009: 9,325 casts, 1,117,587 in situ measurements
OSDO2001: 18,754 casts, 707,176 in situ measurements
OSDO1957: 29,745 casts, 596,026 in situ measurements
OSDO2000: 20,679 casts, 704,120 in situ measurements
OSDO1954: 23,958 casts, 393,891 in situ measurements
OSDO2005: 14,761 casts, 805,056 in situ measurements
OSDO2003: 15,069 casts, 743,554 in situ measurements
OSDO2004: 14,711 casts, 721,812 in situ measurements
OSDO1956: 27,722 casts, 464,560 in situ measurements
OSDS1939: 17,523 casts, 704,916 in situ measurements
OSDO1953: 22,693 casts, 407,785 in situ measurements
OSDO2002: 15,410 casts, 628,861 in situ measurements
OSDO1952: 27,393 casts, 431,811 in situ measurements
OSDS1938: 16,774 casts, 658,839 in situ measurements
OSDS1935: 17,458 casts, 613,331 in situ measurements
OSDS2010: 8,464 casts, 823,457 in situ measurements
OSDS1934: 14,686 casts, 560,460 in situ measurements
OSDS1936: 15,518 casts, 581,939 in situ measurements
OSDS1949: 14,425 casts, 659,458 in situ measurements
OSDS2013: 10,201 casts, 763,365 in situ measurements
OSDO1951: 26,130 casts, 418,291 in situ measurements
OSDO2006: 14,145 casts, 598,959 in situ measurements
OSDS2011: 6,103 casts, 761,157 in situ measurements
OSDO2007: 11,941 casts, 662,571 in situ measurements
OSDS1937: 14,765 casts, 566,135 in situ measurements
OSDS1940: 12,378 casts, 578,558 in situ measurements
OSDS2012: 10,228 casts, 658,313 in situ measurements
OSDO2009: 9,325 casts, 587,303 in situ measurements
OSDO2008: 10,945 casts, 576,791 in situ measurements
OSDO1950: 19,159 casts, 369,057 in situ measurements
OSDS1933: 11,786 casts, 499,503 in situ measurements
OSDS1941: 9,756 casts, 506,821 in situ measurements
OSDS2016: 6,948 casts, 618,324 in situ measurements
OSDS1948: 13,392 casts, 436,240 in situ measurements
OSDS1932: 13,460 casts, 430,496 in situ measurements
OSDO2013: 10,201 casts, 414,020 in situ measurements
OSDO2010: 8,464 casts, 438,951 in situ measurements
OSDO1934: 14,686 casts, 211,420 in situ measurements
OSDO1939: 17,523 casts, 279,549 in situ measurements
OSDO2012: 10,228 casts, 398,005 in situ measurements
OSDO1935: 17,458 casts, 224,897 in situ measurements
OSDO1936: 15,518 casts, 221,281 in situ measurements
OSDS2017: 6,759 casts, 462,655 in situ measurements
OSDS2015: 7,245 casts, 436,128 in situ measurements
OSDO1938: 16,774 casts, 256,668 in situ measurements
OSDO1949: 14,425 casts, 279,932 in situ measurements
OSDS1931: 9,557 casts, 301,315 in situ measurements
OSDO2011: 6,103 casts, 383,502 in situ measurements
OSDS2014: 8,822 casts, 375,165 in situ measurements
OSDS1930: 8,667 casts, 315,599 in situ measurements
OSDO1937: 14,765 casts, 212,508 in situ measurements
OSDO2016: 6,948 casts, 337,130 in situ measurements
OSDO1948: 13,392 casts, 191,972 in situ measurements
OSDO1932: 13,460 casts, 187,092 in situ measurements
OSDS1947: 9,131 casts, 235,276 in situ measurements
OSDO1940: 12,378 casts, 209,742 in situ measurements
OSDS1929: 6,930 casts, 270,307 in situ measurements
OSDS1942: 7,025 casts, 255,431 in situ measurements
OSDO2017: 6,759 casts, 306,902 in situ measurements
OSDO1933: 11,786 casts, 195,166 in situ measurements
OSDO2015: 7,245 casts, 283,764 in situ measurements
OSDO2014: 8,822 casts, 233,179 in situ measurements
OSDS1928: 7,525 casts, 215,927 in situ measurements
OSDO1941: 9,756 casts, 180,905 in situ measurements
OSDS1943: 6,388 casts, 206,498 in situ measurements
OSDS1927: 7,509 casts, 193,341 in situ measurements
OSDO1931: 9,557 casts, 137,020 in situ measurements
OSDS1926: 6,506 casts, 193,757 in situ measurements
OSDO1947: 9,131 casts, 117,126 in situ measurements
OSDS1946: 6,595 casts, 153,236 in situ measurements
OSDO1930: 8,667 casts, 126,759 in situ measurements
OSDS1911: 10,025 casts, 96,957 in situ measurements
OSDS1925: 4,928 casts, 145,792 in situ measurements
OSDO1929: 6,930 casts, 106,867 in situ measurements
OSDS1944: 5,389 casts, 130,149 in situ measurements
OSDO1942: 7,025 casts, 100,308 in situ measurements
OSDS1913: 8,799 casts, 77,932 in situ measurements
OSDS1910: 8,472 casts, 80,339 in situ measurements
OSDS1906: 8,038 casts, 74,836 in situ measurements
OSDO1928: 7,525 casts, 88,645 in situ measurements
OSDO1927: 7,509 casts, 80,780 in situ measurements
OSDS1905: 8,551 casts, 63,427 in situ measurements
OSDO1911: 10,025 casts, 51,316 in situ measurements
OSDS1912: 8,249 casts, 70,093 in situ measurements
OSDO1946: 6,595 casts, 84,682 in situ measurements
OSDO1943: 6,388 casts, 86,293 in situ measurements
OSDS1922: 7,247 casts, 80,515 in situ measurements
OSDS1904: 7,869 casts, 57,327 in situ measurements
OSDS1914: 7,655 casts, 70,866 in situ measurements
OSDS1924: 4,817 casts, 111,152 in situ measurements
OSDS1909: 7,987 casts, 63,492 in situ measurements
OSDO1926: 6,506 casts, 79,670 in situ measurements
OSDS1903: 7,903 casts, 55,877 in situ measurements
OSDS1921: 7,941 casts, 62,195 in situ measurements
OSDO1905: 8,551 casts, 38,019 in situ measurements
OSDO1913: 8,799 casts, 40,425 in situ measurements
OSDS1907: 8,211 casts, 51,538 in situ measurements
OSDO1906: 8,038 casts, 40,908 in situ measurements
OSDS1908: 7,551 casts, 58,737 in situ measurements
OSDO1910: 8,472 casts, 39,537 in situ measurements
OSDO1904: 7,869 casts, 34,729 in situ measurements
OSDO1912: 8,249 casts, 36,576 in situ measurements
OSDO1903: 7,903 casts, 34,445 in situ measurements
OSDO1944: 5,389 casts, 67,454 in situ measurements
OSDO1909: 7,987 casts, 35,620 in situ measurements
OSDO1907: 8,211 casts, 31,634 in situ measurements
OSDO1921: 7,941 casts, 36,070 in situ measurements
OSDO1922: 7,247 casts, 43,049 in situ measurements
OSDO1914: 7,655 casts, 38,777 in situ measurements
OSDS1920: 7,311 casts, 43,357 in situ measurements
OSDS1902: 7,020 casts, 38,465 in situ measurements
OSDS1923: 3,538 casts, 86,847 in situ measurements
OSDS1901: 6,748 casts, 35,808 in situ measurements
OSDO1925: 4,928 casts, 62,161 in situ measurements
OSDO1908: 7,551 casts, 31,829 in situ measurements
OSDO1920: 7,311 casts, 28,517 in situ measurements
OSDO1902: 7,020 casts, 24,629 in situ measurements
OSDS1900: 6,463 casts, 26,471 in situ measurements
OSDO1901: 6,748 casts, 21,564 in situ measurements
OSDO1924: 4,817 casts, 52,894 in situ measurements
OSDS1945: 3,693 casts, 63,031 in situ measurements
OSDO1900: 6,463 casts, 18,072 in situ measurements
OSDS2018: 407 casts, 102,426 in situ measurements
OSDO1945: 3,693 casts, 42,846 in situ measurements
OSDS1919: 4,471 casts, 27,771 in situ measurements
OSDO1923: 3,538 casts, 39,079 in situ measurements
OSDO1919: 4,471 casts, 17,370 in situ measurements
OSDS1915: 3,043 casts, 26,158 in situ measurements
OSDO1915: 3,043 casts, 12,985 in situ measurements
OSDO2018: 407 casts, 38,901 in situ measurements
OSDS1918: 2,128 casts, 14,766 in situ measurements
OSDS1917: 1,941 casts, 14,372 in situ measurements
OSDS1916: 1,845 casts, 12,491 in situ measurements
OSDO1918: 2,128 casts, 8,829 in situ measurements
OSDO1917: 1,941 casts, 9,735 in situ measurements
OSDO1916: 1,845 casts, 6,841 in situ measurements

OSD: 6,458,117 casts, 260,552,200 in situ measurements

PFLO2015A: 52,144 casts, 58,273,695 in situ measurements
PFLO2014B: 56,672 casts, 58,494,752 in situ measurements
PFLO2018C: 39,661 casts, 60,729,263 in situ measurements
PFLO2018A: 38,658 casts, 58,719,953 in situ measurements
PFLO2015B: 48,767 casts, 58,081,117 in situ measurements
PFLO2013B: 68,336 casts, 58,187,624 in situ measurements
PFLO2017B: 41,668 casts, 58,769,585 in situ measurements
PFLO2016A: 46,495 casts, 58,067,328 in situ measurements
PFLO2017D: 39,193 casts, 58,612,661 in situ measurements
PFLO2017A: 41,047 casts, 58,454,079 in situ measurements
PFLO2018B: 39,290 casts, 59,873,873 in situ measurements
PFLO2017C: 39,894 casts, 58,690,347 in situ measurements
PFLO2018D: 39,778 casts, 60,619,967 in situ measurements
PFLO2014A: 59,420 casts, 58,325,126 in situ measurements
PFLO2015C: 49,026 casts, 58,145,011 in situ measurements
PFLO2012A: 100,232 casts, 57,301,030 in situ measurements
PFLO2013A: 76,708 casts, 58,068,638 in situ measurements
PFLO2011A: 124,331 casts, 56,878,448 in situ measurements
PFLO2016C: 44,318 casts, 58,395,958 in situ measurements
PFLO2016B: 45,720 casts, 58,239,754 in situ measurements
PFLO2016D: 39,944 casts, 54,819,772 in situ measurements
PFLO2010: 120,407 casts, 47,393,113 in situ measurements
PFLO2014C: 43,805 casts, 47,496,106 in situ measurements
PFLO2009: 122,052 casts, 41,643,793 in situ measurements
PFLO2008: 116,307 casts, 39,165,079 in situ measurements
PFLO2012B: 43,095 casts, 28,832,142 in situ measurements
PFLO2015D: 22,856 casts, 27,993,806 in situ measurements
PFLO2007: 101,917 casts, 25,625,651 in situ measurements
PFLS2016: 176,477 casts, 22,056,468 in situ measurements
PFLS2015: 172,793 casts, 21,489,384 in situ measurements
PFLS2017: 167,868 casts, 21,330,886 in situ measurements
PFLS2018: 167,716 casts, 21,234,969 in situ measurements
PFLS2014: 159,897 casts, 19,793,477 in situ measurements
PFLS2013: 156,224 casts, 18,731,137 in situ measurements
PFLO2006: 87,329 casts, 19,332,032 in situ measurements
PFLS2012: 143,327 casts, 17,204,968 in situ measurements
PFLO2019: 12,438 casts, 20,288,686 in situ measurements
PFLS2011: 129,247 casts, 15,208,331 in situ measurements
PFLS2010: 120,407 casts, 13,963,452 in situ measurements
PFLS2009: 122,052 casts, 13,887,610 in situ measurements
PFLO2018E: 10,329 casts, 16,766,045 in situ measurements
PFLS2008: 116,307 casts, 13,188,484 in situ measurements
PFLO2005: 66,417 casts, 13,265,613 in situ measurements
PFLS2007: 101,917 casts, 11,383,769 in situ measurements
PFLS2006: 87,329 casts, 9,639,710 in situ measurements
PFLO2013C: 11,180 casts, 10,483,575 in situ measurements
PFLO2004: 45,112 casts, 8,566,854 in situ measurements
PFLO2017E: 6,066 casts, 9,040,719 in situ measurements
PFLS2005: 66,417 casts, 7,184,069 in situ measurements
PFLO2003: 31,071 casts, 5,779,694 in situ measurements
PFLS2004: 45,112 casts, 4,800,642 in situ measurements
PFLS2003: 31,071 casts, 3,275,837 in situ measurements
PFLO2002: 20,420 casts, 3,569,335 in situ measurements
PFLO2011B: 4,916 casts, 2,567,015 in situ measurements
PFLO2001: 14,678 casts, 2,217,414 in situ measurements
PFLS2002: 20,420 casts, 1,982,557 in situ measurements
PFLO1999: 14,231 casts, 2,065,187 in situ measurements
PFLO2000: 13,854 casts, 1,946,861 in situ measurements
PFLO1998: 11,528 casts, 1,741,369 in situ measurements
PFLS2019: 12,438 casts, 1,627,691 in situ measurements
PFLS2001: 14,678 casts, 1,077,728 in situ measurements
PFLS1999: 14,231 casts, 816,134 in situ measurements
PFLS2000: 13,854 casts, 802,338 in situ measurements
PFLO1997: 5,996 casts, 985,034 in situ measurements
PFLS1998: 11,528 casts, 675,386 in situ measurements
PFLO1996: 2,557 casts, 482,738 in situ measurements
PFLS1997: 5,996 casts, 370,609 in situ measurements
PFLO1995: 1,038 casts, 201,185 in situ measurements
PFLS1996: 2,557 casts, 127,383 in situ measurements
PFLS1995: 1,038 casts, 53,638 in situ measurements
PFLO1994: 53 casts, 8,073 in situ measurements
PFLO1956: 14 casts, 5,646 in situ measurements
PFLS1994: 53 casts, 2,656 in situ measurements
PFLS1956: 14 casts, 1,505 in situ measurements

PFL: 4,121,936 casts, 1,845,121,564 in situ measurements

UORO1993: 18,606 casts, 12,667,168 in situ measurements
UORO1992: 13,909 casts, 12,168,266 in situ measurements
UORO2004: 39,961 casts, 6,780,633 in situ measurements
UORO2000: 10,344 casts, 5,247,879 in situ measurements
UORO1997: 8,254 casts, 4,991,222 in situ measurements
UORO2006: 1,385 casts, 4,605,468 in situ measurements
UORO2009: 1,359 casts, 4,386,592 in situ measurements
UORO2002: 1,391 casts, 4,114,192 in situ measurements
UORO2008: 1,315 casts, 3,670,480 in situ measurements
UORO2005: 1,331 casts, 3,506,706 in situ measurements
UORO2003: 4,043 casts, 3,214,953 in situ measurements
UORO2001: 1,299 casts, 3,153,876 in situ measurements
UORO2007: 660 casts, 2,869,201 in situ measurements
UORO1994: 8,397 casts, 2,370,766 in situ measurements
UORS1993: 18,612 casts, 1,632,169 in situ measurements
UORS1992: 13,909 casts, 1,499,469 in situ measurements
UORO1991: 2,387 casts, 1,362,795 in situ measurements
UORO2012: 1,439 casts, 1,464,114 in situ measurements
UORO2011: 1,229 casts, 1,465,925 in situ measurements
UORO2010: 1,232 casts, 1,353,387 in situ measurements
UORS2004: 39,961 casts, 411,328 in situ measurements
UORS2000: 10,344 casts, 933,830 in situ measurements
UORO1995: 1,933 casts, 927,083 in situ measurements
UORS1997: 8,254 casts, 629,188 in situ measurements
UORO1996: 2,286 casts, 843,878 in situ measurements
UORO1999: 1,634 casts, 683,707 in situ measurements
UORO1990: 1,407 casts, 603,772 in situ measurements
UORO1998: 1,429 casts, 601,409 in situ measurements
UORS1994: 8,397 casts, 458,453 in situ measurements
UORS1996: 2,286 casts, 129,070 in situ measurements
UORS2003: 4,043 casts, 97,879 in situ measurements
UORS1991: 2,387 casts, 106,146 in situ measurements
UORS1995: 1,933 casts, 107,229 in situ measurements
UORS1999: 1,634 casts, 86,774 in situ measurements
UORS2006: 1,385 casts, 75,502 in situ measurements
UORS1998: 1,429 casts, 71,563 in situ measurements
UORS2002: 1,391 casts, 71,690 in situ measurements
UORS2009: 1,359 casts, 72,484 in situ measurements
UORS1990: 1,407 casts, 68,763 in situ measurements
UORS2001: 1,299 casts, 69,593 in situ measurements
UORS2008: 1,315 casts, 67,577 in situ measurements
UORS2005: 1,331 casts, 67,286 in situ measurements
UORS2012: 1,439 casts, 63,844 in situ measurements
UORO1989: 257 casts, 77,142 in situ measurements
UORS2010: 1,232 casts, 53,052 in situ measurements
UORS2011: 1,229 casts, 52,274 in situ measurements
UORS2007: 660 casts, 42,007 in situ measurements
UORS1989: 257 casts, 13,664 in situ measurements
UORO1988: 35 casts, 18,537 in situ measurements
UORS1988: 35 casts, 1,806 in situ measurements
UORO1986: 6 casts, 825 in situ measurements
UORO1982: 4 casts, 432 in situ measurements
UORS1986: 6 casts, 249 in situ measurements
UORO1984: 2 casts, 234 in situ measurements
UORO1987: 2 casts, 243 in situ measurements
UORS1982: 4 casts, 190 in situ measurements
UORO1983: 1 casts, 147 in situ measurements
UORS1984: 2 casts, 96 in situ measurements
UORS1987: 2 casts, 88 in situ measurements
UORS1983: 1 casts, 52 in situ measurements
UORO1976: 1 casts, 51 in situ measurements
UORS1976: 1 casts, 32 in situ measurements

UOR: 255,082 casts, 90,034,430 in situ measurements


Totals:
Casts: 22,970,125
In situ measurements: 5,454,896,887

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

The Photon Current - 2

Fig. 1 WOD Layers
I. World Ocean Database (WOD)

The graphic at Fig. 1 lists 18 latitude oriented layers, numbered from zero ('0') to seventeen ('17').

Each layer is composed of 36 WOD zones (WOD Zones).

II. WOD Data Scope

In the previous post of this series, in order to produce graphs, I considered and used in situ data from all of the 18 WOD Layers (The Photon Current).

In today's post we will limit the scope to focus generally on WOD layers related to Antarctica and the Antarctic current (The Antarctic CP Current, ACC).

That limited scope involves only WOD layers 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17.

III. Subject Matter Scope

What I intend to do is show graphs that impact the general thermocline theory as I did in
Fig. 2 ACC (yellow), warmer water (red)
the first post of this series, when I wrote:
"For example in the graph at Fig. 2b since circa 1950 the Hadopelagic (deepest) ocean depth level has had more OHC than the shallower depth level above it (the Abyssopelagic). Thermocline theory is at odds with that (Fig. 5)."
(The Photon Current). I want to show that the Antarctic is being impacted in the same manner as the entire world ocean is, so, I will limit today's graphs to the WOD layers related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) which I have shown with some color enhancements (Fig. 2).

That Fig. 2 map is a modified ocean current map taken from "Fig. 4.6.1" in "The ACC System", 2001 (hereinafter "TACCS 2001").

More about that in Section V. below. 

IV. The Graphs

Fig. 3 CT @ Pelagic Depths
Fig. 4 Things Have Changed
Fig. 5 Ocean Heat Content (OHC)
The graphs at Fig. 3 - Fig. 5 show us that things have changed since TACCS 2001.

Like the world oceans, the deepest depths in the WOD layers around Antarctica where the ACC flows, have more Ocean Heat Content (OHC) per kilogram of seawater (in the form of infrared photons) in the Hadopelagic depth layer than the Abyssopelagic layer above it.

That is, the Hadopelagic (deepest) ocean depth level has, for years, had more OHC per kilogram of seawater than the shallower Abyssopelagic depth level above it, which is at odds with general thermocline theory.

The graph at Fig. 4 even shows a case (circa 2000 when TACCS 2001 was being written) where the Hadopelagic depth level had more OHC per kg than all the other depth levels up to and including the Epipelagic.

This Southern Ocean today is not our grandmother's and grandfather's Southern Ocean.

Note to The Warming Commentariat (The Warming Science Commentariat, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) concerning OHC and OHF: stay out of the textbooks, read only emerging science in peer reviewed papers written by scientists who are "Woke."

Things have changed.

V. What Has Changed

Probably the most important issue in TACCS 2001 is the concept of "teleconnections" between or among the ACC and other ocean basins:
"The absence of land barriers in the latitude band of Drake Passage has a profound influence on the dynamics of currents in the Southern Ocean and, more generally, on the earth’s climate. Within this band, the strong eastward flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) connects each of the ocean basins" (The interbasin connection, 4.6.1, p.1 PDF).

"The vigorous interbasin exchange accomplished by the ACC also admits the possibility of oceanic teleconnections" (ibid).

"The ACC is of interest in part because it allows communication between the ocean basins" (4.6.2.3, p.9 PDF).
(TACCS 2001, emphasis added). But, lacking any discussion of infrared photons the writers go on to make a predictable mistake:
"The fact that no net meridional geostrophic flow can exist across the unblocked latitudes isolates the Antarctic continent from the warmer waters at lower latitudes to some extent, contributing to the glacial climate of Antarctica; what heat does get carried poleward to balance the heat lost to the atmosphere must be carried by eddies" (4.6.2.3, p.9 PDF).
(TACCS 2001, emphasis added). Not exactly.

We now know what they did not know back then (The Ghost Photons).

One thing we know is that "Potential Temperature" ( Θ ) was used to produce data shown at "Fig. 4.6.3 (a)" in their paper.

That was a mistake, but potential temperature is still being used in OHC calculations almost two decades later, and is still producing OHC and OHF errors.

In their paper in the "Acknowledgements" section the authors thanked "Trevor McDougall" (TACCS 2001, p. 32 PDF).

Professor McDougall authored a paper a couple of years after that, pointing out that Conservative Temperature, not Potential Temperature, is the correct "temperature" variable, and that "Potential Enthalpy" is the correct ocean heat variable if you want to accurately track ocean heat content and flux (McDougall 2003).

The WOD in situ data I used (with the TEOS-10 toolbox that Dr. McDougall helped bring to fruition) to calculate Conservative Temperature, Potential Enthalpy, and the infrared photon count, all come together to show that OHF is taking place.

It is taking place to the point that OHC in the deepest depth level around Antarctica is being increasingly warmed by infrared photon radiation as warmer waters flow into the ACC (The Ghost Plumes - 8).

VI. Closing Comments

It is time to bring modern quantum physics into the search and research for OHC and OHF.

The quantum currents are where the action is.

The previous post in this series is here.

Saturday, June 8, 2019

The Photon Current

Fig. 1 The art: "photon current"
I. Size Matters

What is the largest current in the oceans of the world?

Is it the Gulf Stream?

Is it the AMOC?

Is it the current with more flowing water in it than all the river water flowing in all of the rivers of the world (Mysterious Zones of Antarctica - 3)?

No, in terms of the flow of individual quanta, it's the quantum photon stream, i.e. "the photon current" composed of infrared photons (The Ghost Photons).

The range or span of the photon current is as large as the ocean itself, even though the infrared photons themselves are some of the smallest photons in the electromagnetic spectrum.

II. Photon Size

The "size" of a photon is expressed in terms of wavelength and/or frequency.

Interestingly, the longer the wavelength, the "smaller" the photon in terms of the energy it has, and conversely the shorter the wavelength the "larger" the photon in terms of the energy it has (Photon Energy).

The photon "size" I am focusing on, in terms of Ocean Heat Content (OHC), is the infrared sized photons:
"Infrared radiation (IR), or infrared light, is a type of radiant energy that's
Fig. 2a CT @ all WOD Layers
Fig. 2b IR photon m.avg. Count @ all WOD Layers
invisible to human eyes but that we can feel as heat. All objects in the universe emit some level of IR radiation, but two of the most obvious sources are the sun and fire.


IR is a type of electromagnetic radiation, a continuum of frequencies produced when atoms absorb and then release energy. From highest to lowest frequency, electromagnetic radiation includes gamma-rays, X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, visible light, infrared radiation, microwaves and radio waves. Together, these types of radiation make up the electromagnetic spectrum."
(What Is Infrared?). There is another interesting thing about the realm of electromagnetic radiation.
Fig. 3a Hadopelagic
Fig. 3b Abysopelagic
Fig. 3c Bathypelagic
Fig. 3d Mesopelagic
Fig. 3e Epipelagic

It concerns something that the researcher who discovered infrared light discovered about photon size.

Which is that size is not not the only thing that is important about infrared radiation:
"British astronomer William Herschel discovered infrared light in 1800, according to NASA. In an experiment to measure the difference in temperature between the colors in the visible spectrum, he placed thermometers in the path of light within each color of the visible spectrum. He observed an increase in temperature from blue to red, and he found an even warmer temperature measurement just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum.
...
IR radiation is one of the three ways heat is transferred from one place to another, the other two being convection and conduction."
(ibid, emphasis added). In other words, the temperature measured by thermometers is not enough to tell us about the amount of heat content.

So, the fact that infrared photons in seawater, by way of radiation, carry OHC from one place to another, means that we need to know how many infrared photons there are in a particular kilogram (kg) of seawater in order to know the heat content value.

The in situ temperature is not enough in and of itself to tell us how much "heat" content there is.

Conservative Temperature (CT), even though it is a better indicator (because it can tell us about Ocean Heat Flux (OHF) due to it being in thermodynamic proportion to the heat flux and heat content), still can't tell us the OHC of a kg of seawater.

We have to know the potential enthalpy (hO) in order to calculate the number of infrared photons per kg.

III. Sizing Up The Graphs

The thermodynamic proportion between CT and the photon count can be seen in the graphs at Fig.2a - Fig. 2b.

The patterns of the two are identical even though the count digits and temperature digits are not the same.

There is a thermodynamic bond between them that holds together over all depths and over time (Fig. 3a - Fig. 3e).

That pattern bond also exists when OHC and OHF are specifically calculated and graphed (Patterns: Conservative Temperature & Potential Enthalpy - 3).

IV. Chasing OHC Is Chasing Photons

Imagine, as shown in Fig. 4, that the red arrows represent infrared photons from the Sun that are entering into the ocean at the surface.

Fig. 4 Imagine
When the seawater molecules that absorb those photons come near enough to other seawater molecules that have fewer such photons (cooler water), some of the photons will radiate from the warmer water to the cooler water (2nd Law of Thermodynamics).

Over time as more and more photons are added to the ocean, more and more of them radiate downward into cooler waters.

Over a long span of time, since the Industrial Revolution began circa 1750, they have even radiated down into the deepest pelagic depths.

For example in the graph at Fig. 2b since circa 1950 the Hadopelagic (deepest) ocean depth level has had more OHC than the shallower depth level above it (the Abysopelagic). Thermocline theory is at odds with that (Fig. 5).

All of the pelagic depths have a bottom composed of the Earth's crust, covered with sand, soil, rocks, sea shells, or other fragmented solid crustal material.

Fig. 5 "Graph showing a tropical ocean
thermocline(depth vs. temperature). Note the
rapid change between 100 and 1000 meters.
The temperature is nearly constant
after 1500 meters depth."
When that bottom material is cooler than the seawater that is near it, i.e. seawater filled with infrared photons, some of those photons will radiate into that material at the bottom.

Over time, depending on the coolness of the material, and the quantity of infrared photons in the seawater, the photons will radiate deeper into the Earth's crust (the red line between the Earth's crust and the seawater in Fig. 4 is the ocean bottom area where those "missing" photons are absorbed).

Therefore, to follow OHC everywhere it radiates to, the deepest ocean depths must be monitored with CTD instruments in the seawater.

But, there also needs to be some other instruments that can measure in situ temperature values in the crustal material of the ocean bottom.

Those instruments must be placed in the crust material at various depths (e.g. up to 1 meter).

Those two types of instruments will map the flow of photons wherever they go, so that researchers can add up all the heat "at Miller time".

V. Closing Comment: Great Size Of The Ocean

An article in "The Hill" has a big time comment:
"Our ocean sustains life on Earth.

The ocean produces the air we breathe, is linked to much of the water we drink, and is home to more than half of all life on the planet. The ocean drives our economy, feeds, employs and transports us. Our ocean inspires us. We travel to be near it and to learn from and be inspired by its vast and undiscovered wilderness, immense power, and diverse ecosystems. But today our ocean is threatened more than ever before.

Pollution is causing the ocean to warm and become more acidic, and pushing species to the brink of extinction. Without significant efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, the effects are anticipated to become more destructive.

We cannot meaningfully address the challenges facing our ocean until we address the dismissal of climate science."
(In the climate crisis, power of our ocean is too great to ignore). Yes, the heat in the ocean is too big not to find.

That is, we need to follow the trail of the photon current where ever it goes in order to fully size it up.

The next post in this series is here.

Friday, June 7, 2019

Square Finger 'Splainin'

The Square-Finger Gesture
If you watch politicians and media folk use their bag of on-camera gestures, one that is quite popular now is what I call the "square-finger" gesture.

It is common to all political party members and TV channel media members.

When I first noticed the wide array of spontaneous uses, I began to count how many times a day over the past year it was used during an interviewee's response/explanation to an interviewer's question.

The square-finger gesture is used to "help explain" subject matter of many types.

It does not seem to matter which pundit, what time of day, what type of TV news or talk show, what subject matter you are viewing, or whether the square-finger gesture is used to man-splain or woman-splain what the splainer is 'splainin'.

No, the square-finger gesture is ubiquitous and shows up spontaneously.

... and ...
After going through the mini-shock of even noticing the phenomenon in the first place, then seeking to make sense of it by attempting to count how many times a day it occurs, I next tried to make more sense of the square-finger gesture by determining the context in which the square-finger gesture was used.

I haven't finished that research, but at the moment it seems to be used when the 'splainer has some degree of fear attached to the subject matter being 'splained.

That is, it is used to minimize some aspect of the subject matter at hand by indicating "this subject matter is only this big, so I am in control of it" a la "Comparing a Group-Mind Trance to a Cultural Amygdala".

I have not yet finished my research on this, so help me out on this one by informing me and fellow Dredd Blog readers if you too have noticed the square-finger gesture (and don't forget to keep sending in your annual helpful responses to "My First Science Fiction Novel").

While doing so, remember that football is played on both sides of the ball (How to control the TV with gestures).

Thursday, June 6, 2019

Economic War Of The Pacific - 6

Downtown tomorrow
I. Background

This series began some years ago (2009) to point out what is becoming, more and more as time goes on,  news that is moving from the back pages toward the front pages of newspapers (Economic War Of The Pacific, 2, 3, 4, 5).

Today is what some call a "sacred" time when "we" intensify a focus on what "we" consider to be the supreme dynamics that produce what "we" call heroes and perhaps sheroes as "we" peruse history and herstory.

Yes, as "we" peruse events that took place during the many times "we" who are now of "Phase 27" (explained later) "lost it" ... along with the meaning of what that "it" was that "we" lost.

While D-day ("the largest seaborne invasion in history") gives an opportunity to swap 75 year old war stories, another gathering mentioned further back in newspaper pages looks toward the future:
"The deepening of the economic alliance between Russia and China will be high on the agenda as President Xi Jinping meets Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow on Wednesday amid their mutual estranged relations with the United States."
(Politico).

"Destroying arms control treaties is 'unacceptable,' Russian President Vladimir Putin said Wednesday during a bilateral meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Kremlin.

During the visit, which was aimed at cementing economic ties between the two countries amid China's heated trade war with the United States, Putin thanked Xi for helping their countries achieve a trade turnover of more than $100 billion a year. He added that Russian-Chinese relations have reached an 'unprecedented level'.
" (CNN)

"Chinese President Xi Jinping has described Russia's Vladimir Putin as his 'best friend' during a three-day visit to Moscow focusing on trade and relations between the two countries.

The visit comes as China-US relations have soured over a bitter trade war.

Russia had decided on a pivot to the east years ago after ties worsened with the West over the Ukraine conflict.

The two sides have signed a package of trade deals and Mr Xi also unveiled two pandas for the Moscow Zoo.

The Chinese president arrived on Wednesday and later gave a press conference where he said he had a 'deep personal friendship' with his Russian counterpart.

'In the past six years, we have met nearly 30 times. Russia is the country that I have visited the most times, and President Putin is my best friend and colleague,' Mr Xi said.

Mr Putin echoed the praise saying he was 'pleased to say that Russian-Chinese relations have reached an unprecedented level. It is a global partnership and strategic cooperation.'" (BBC)
The lyrics of an "anti-war song" come to mind, a song which illustrates that things have not changed much since it was written:

"There's battle lines being drawn
Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Young people speaking their minds
Getting so much resistance from behind
"

(For What It Is Worth). Can you imagine trying to calculate the "worth" of peace (How Much Is Peace Actually Worth?) while dwelling in a civilization that is quickly reaching Phase 27 ... in the history and herstory of civilizations (The Rus People)?

By "Phase 27" I am alluding to:
"In the Study Toynbee examined the rise and fall of 26 civilizations in the course of human history, and he concluded that they rose by responding successfully to challenges under the leadership of creative minorities composed of elite leaders. Civilizations declined when their leaders stopped responding creatively, and the civilizations then sank owing to the sins of nationalism, militarism, and the tyranny of a despotic minority."
(Encyclopedia Britannica, emphasis added). Adding a one to the previous 26, we calculate that we are at Phase 27, but where is that at (You Are Here)?

Unfortunately, along with the greatest generation which has already done all it can do now, "we" (Phase 27) are the only members of the group of 27 civilizations that have the ultimate power to stop it all.

By "stop it all" I mean stop life on Earth as we know it with a nuclear war and/or global warming induced climate change, either of which can eradicate "life's habitat" on this planet.

II. Foreground

The future is closer to us than the past is, i.e., the future is the foreground.

But, for some reason or lack thereof, "our cognition" lies to us and says that the foreground is further away than the background is.

III. Closing Conversation

Once upon a time in the Matrix:
"What is your background sir," asks the interviewer.

"I would rather contemplate my foreground sir," replies the interviewee.
(Who is the “One” in The Matrix?).

The previous post in this series is here.







Tuesday, June 4, 2019

In Search Of Ocean Heat - 6

Pelagic Depths
I. Background

In today's post I use World Ocean Database (WOD) data and TEOS-10 to calculate Ocean Heat Content (OHC) in the WOD Zones along the coast of China and the USA.

If you want to explore the nitty-gritty of OHC you can peruse the previous posts in this series (In Search Of Ocean Heat, 2, 3, 4, 5).

In the first post of the series, Professor McDougall was featured.

He discusses the problem in current software models when it comes to calculating OHC.

The second post talked about and used the updated WOD datasets of 2018, which updated their 2013 data.

China Conservative Temperature
China OHC & SA @ Epipelagic
China OHC & SA @ Mesopelagic
China OHC & SA @Bathypelagic
USA Seacoast Code 760, Abyssopelagic
USA Seacoast Code 760, Bathypelagic
USA Seacoast Code 760, Epipelagic
USA Seacoast Code 760, Mesopelagic
USA Seacoast Code 760, CT at depth
USA Seacoast Code 821, CT at depth
USA Seacoast Code 823, CT at depth
USA Seacoast Code 940, CT at depth
USA Seacoast Code 960, CT at depth
The third post focuses in on how to calculate OHC (potential enthalpy, hO) and Ocean Heat Flux (OHF) with easy to use TEOS-10 functions for calculating Conservative Temperature (CT), Potential Enthalpy (hO), and infra-red photon content as the carrier of "heat."

The fourth post discusses and graphs the infra-red photon content of seawater using CT, hO (and among other things, Planck's Constant).

The fifth post reiterates some and talks about Gibbs and the exactness of his work, pointing out that Albert Einstein called Gibbs the greatest mind in American scientific history.

II. Some Typical Graphs

In today's graphs we apply that background to the coastal waters along the coast of China, which has only one coastline code (610).

That is the coastline where the busiest seaports of our current world civilization are located.

That background is also applied to the coastline codes of the USA where there US seaports are located (760, 821, 823, 940, and 960).

The busiest seaport in the USA is Los Angeles, which rates number 18 in the top twenty world seaports.

These rankings change from time to time (#1 can become #2, and on down the line), so one must recheck the list each year or so to stay current (Top 50).

The important lesson to keep in mind is that when one is using CT it pictures the pattern and trend of OHC, OHF, hO, and infra-red photon content of seawater (per kg).

In other words, the graphed CT pattern and trend as it moves up and down along a time line is also the pattern of OHC and OHF.

That is because, through Gibbs' formulas in the TEOS-10 toolbox, the thermodynamic equilibrium and proportionality is preserved (Patterns: Conservative Temperature & Potential Enthalpy, 2, 3).

That proportion holds for whatever portion of the ocean and at whatever depth the in situ measurements have been taken.

This makes it much easier to quickly detect ongoing changes anywhere there are measurements stored in datasets.

One can peruse graphs of CT, then decide where more focus is needed.

III. Future Research

Researchers have continually pointed out that a major need at this time is to measure the Hadopelagic, the deepest depths.

Recently we saw a photograph of a plastic bag at the bottom of the ocean in the Hadopelagic (Plastic proliferates at the bottom of world's deepest ocean trench).

That plastic is even found inside the deep sea creatures (A Troubling Discovery in the Deepest Ocean Trenches).

That means we can also take temperature, salinity, and depth measurements while we are down there.

That is the scientific way to follow OHC and OHF so as to develop the complete picture.

It would also be instructive to periodically take the temperature of the ocean water at the bottom, as well as measurements to some shallow depth below the sandy surface of the ocean bottom.

I say that because if the bottom is cooler than the ocean water, the photons will flow from the sea water into the sand, and we could lose track of the OHC and OHF.

IV. Closing Comments

We hear a lot about the "missing ocean heat" so we should seek out and follow the infrared photon radiation where ever it takes us.

Lots of the "heat" carrying photons flow into cooler water around them, or into Tidewater Glacier ice, or into ice shelves.

Why would the photons not also do the same at the ocean bottom where the liquid seawater contacts cooler sandy solids?

There are several vast potential "hideouts" for infrared photons.

If we don't want to have missing OHC then we will have to add up ALL infrared photon radiation not only from all ocean depths, but also from those other places we aren't adequately measuring yet (The Photon Current).

The previous post in this series is here.